Presidential Proclamation Restricts Travel from 8 Countries

Editor's note:

Update October 17, 2017

The U.S. District Court of Hawaii issued a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) today that blocks enforcement of the Proclamation’s bar on six of the eight countries, effective October 17, 2017. The Proclamation's bars on North Korea and Venezuela were not included in the TRO, and remain in effect. The six countries are:

  • Chad
  • Iran
  • Libya
  • Somalia
  • Syria
  • Yemen

See additional information on the NAFSA website.
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September 26, 2017

A Presidential Proclamation that affects travel into the U.S. by some citizens of eight countries was issued on September 24, 2017. The new rules vary by country.

Summary information has been posted on the NAFSA website. NAFSA is the premier professional association for international education.  We have pasted their text below.

We will continue to monitor the situation and keep you posted as things continue to evolve and more information is issued by the Department of State and the Customs and Border Protection.

Also, you may access links to the Presidential Proclamation, news articles and a Reuters video on our Immigration Alerts and Resources page.

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The eight countries subject to the Proclamation are:

  1. Chad
  2. Iran
  3. Libya
  4. North Korea
  5. Somalia
  6. Syria
  7. Venezuela
  8. Yemen

Iraq is not listed as one of the countries, but the Proclamation states that DHS recommended "that nationals of Iraq who seek to enter the United States be subject to additional scrutiny to determine if they pose risks to the national security or public safety of the United States."

COUNTRIES AND CONDITIONS

Nationals of the following eight countries will generally be ineligible for a visa or for admission to the United States, unless otherwise exempt, excepted, or granted a waiver:

Chad

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is not suspended.

Iran

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry of Iranian nationals “under valid student (F and M) and exchange visitor (J) visas is not suspended, although such individuals should be subject to enhanced screening and vetting requirements.”
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is suspended.

Libya

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is not suspended.

North Korea

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for all nonimmigrant visa categories.

Syria

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for all nonimmigrant visa categories

Venezuela

  • Entry is suspended for Venezuelan nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas, but only for officials of government agencies of Venezuela involved in screening and vetting procedures - including the Ministry of the Popular Power for Interior, Justice and Peace; the Administrative Service of Identification, Migration and Immigration; the Scientific, Penal and Criminal Investigation Service Corps; the Bolivarian National Intelligence Service; and the Ministry of the Popular Power for Foreign Relations - and their immediate family members.
  • Nationals of Venezuela not subject to the above suspension should nevertheless “be subject to appropriate additional measures to ensure traveler information remains current.”

Yemen

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is not suspended.

Somalia

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • “Visa adjudications for nationals of Somalia and decisions regarding their entry as nonimmigrants should be subject to additional scrutiny to determine if applicants are connected to terrorist organizations or otherwise pose a threat to the national security or public safety of the United States.” 
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Read the NAFSA webpage (updated on October 17, 2017) for more information about:

  • Effective Dates
  • Exemptions and Exceptions
  • Waivers
  • Background